Capture the infinite in your verse

All the known letters written by La Pira to Quasimodo contain a constant invitation to reflect on the fact that “we are all called to the ways of holiness” (letter from Vienna, 1930).

While calling his friend’s attention to the great spiritual energy of his poetry “… because you have the virtue of appearing to me in a backdrop of infinity – of that luminous and serene infinity that Jesus came to open up in our souls” (ibid). 

“You are a poet in the most sublime sense of this word! But you must be the sweet and powerful jester of God!” (letter from Munich, 1928).

This point is explored in greater depth in a letter of 1927:

… I believe that when verse is perfect it is so because within it the finite is overtaken by the infinite that it fixes. It is a passage, accomplished, of eternity. Which, albeit enclosed within the confines of the human word, still has no let in showing us its divine nature. 

This is why poetry and art in general does not perish but remains despite human vicissitudes.

Where the finite is strengthened by the infinite, where the word of man is underpinned by the beauty of God, there, time does not pass in vain. 

… Now, I do not delude myself by thinking that with your verse – the happy key that enables you to unlock the mystical houses of the soul – you could write noteworthy passages of mystery, the illuminated and illuminating mystery that is given to us by the Revelation of Jesus Christ.